Testosterone Propionate Course

Testosterone Propionate Course

Application features

As with all oil solutions, Testosterone Propionate injections should be administered very slowly (over 2 minutes) intramuscularly. Pulmonary microembolism with oil solutions can rarely cause symptoms such as cough, shortness of breath, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or fainting. These reactions can occur during or immediately after infusion and are reversible. Therefore, patients should be monitored during and after each injection to enable early detection of possible symptoms of pulmonary lipoembolism. Treatment is usually supportive: B. Oxygen Therapy.

Like all oily solutions, testosterone propionate is administered intramuscularly. Care must be taken to ensure that the substance to be injected does not get into the container. Taking the solution very slowly can avoid short-term reactions that are sometimes reported during or immediately after the injection of the oil solution (name cough, coughing fits, respiratory depression). Use with caution in patients with heart failure, hypertension, epilepsy, migraine, renal dysfunction. In patients with a history of cardiac, renal or hepatic dysfunction, androgen use may result in edema complications with or without congestive heart failure.

Application features

Caution should be exercised when using the drug in patients with diseases that cause fluid retention and edema. Use with caution in patients with porphyria. Liver and kidney function, thyroid function and blood sugar levels should be monitored during treatment. Prostate cancer should be ruled out before starting treatment in men, since androgens increase the risk of prostatic hyperplasia. As a precautionary measure, regular prostate examinations are recommended. In addition to laboratory measurements of testosterone levels, the following laboratory parameters should be monitored in patients using androgens for a long period of time: hemoglobin, hematocrit (first every 3 months, then annually) and liver function tests. Due to the possibility of thrombosis, the drug should be prescribed with caution to men after recent operations or injuries. Substance abuse or addiction. Androgens should not be used to support muscle growth in healthy individuals or to increase physical performance. Use during pregnancy or lactation. There are insufficient data on the use of this drug during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Due to the characteristic virilizing effect of the drug on the fetus, its use is contraindicated during pregnancy or lactation. The drug should be discontinued if pregnancy is diagnosed. Children. Safety and efficacy in children have not been established and are therefore not recommended for use in pediatric practice. The use of testosterone in children in conjunction with masculinization can lead to accelerated growth and maturation of bone tissue and premature closure of the growth area of ​​the pineal gland, resulting in a reduction in terminal growth. Ability to affect reaction speed when driving or working with other mechanisms. Refrain from driving or working with other mechanisms while taking this medicine.

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Application features

Drug Interactions and Other Interactions

With substances that induce microsomal liver enzymes (barbiturates, rifampicin, carbamazepine, phenylbutazone, and phenytoin), the effectiveness of testosterone may be impaired. In severe hypogonadism, propionate testosterone may be used in combination with estrogen-stimulating drugs that stimulate thyroid function. It increases the effectiveness of anabolic substances, vitamins, calcium-containing preparations, phosphorus and slows the elimination of cyclosporins.
Androgens may increase glucose tolerance and reduce the need for insulin or oral antidiabetic drugs in people with diabetes.
Androgens may affect the metabolism of other drugs (an increase in serum oxyphenbutazone concentrations has been observed). In addition, testosterone and its derivatives have been reported to increase the activity of oral anticoagulants and may require dose adjustment. Nevertheless, intramuscular injection restriction should always be considered in patients with acquired or hereditary bleeding disorders.

Drug Interactions and Other Interactions


Concomitant use of testosterone with adrenocorticotropic hormone or corticosteroids increases the risk of edema.
Barbiturates and alcohol decrease testosterone activity.

Dosage and application

For men with acromegaly as well as testicles and congenital malignancies, surgical or trauma removal, and acromegaly, 25-50 mg intramuscularly or subcutaneously should be prescribed once every two days or after two days. The duration of treatment depends on the effectiveness of treatment and the nature of the disease. After the clinical picture has improved, testosterone propionate is administered at a maintenance dose of 5-10 mg daily or every other day. Testosterone propionate with endocrine impotence and male menopause, vascular and nervous disorders is prescribed 10 mg or 25 mg daily 2-3 times a week for 1-2 months. For the treatment of male infertility, use 10 mg twice a week for 4-6 months and 50 mg every other day for 10 days. In pathological male menopause, the drug is prescribed 25 mg twice a week for 2 months with a monthly break of 1-2 months.

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In combination with substances that induce microsomal liver enzymes (barbiturates, rifampicin, carbamazepine, phenylbutazone, phenytoin), the effect of testosterone can be impaired. In severe hypogonadism, testosterone propionate can be combined with estrogen-stimulating drugs that stimulate thyroid function. Increases the effect of anabolic substances, vitamins, preparations containing calcium, phosphorus, slows down the elimination of cyclosporine. Androgens may increase glucose tolerance and decrease the need for insulin or oral antidiabetics in people with diabetes.

Dosage and application

In addition, testosterone and its derivatives have been reported to increase the activity of oral anticoagulants, which may necessitate dose adjustments. However, limitations in intramuscular injection should always be considered in patients with acquired or congenital coagulation disorders. Concomitant use of testosterone and ACTH or corticosteroids may increase the risk of edema. Barbiturates and alcohol reduce testosterone activity.
For women who have undergone extensive breast cancer treatment, take 100 mg 2-3 times a week.
children
Its use in pediatrics is not recommended as safety and efficacy in children have not been established. Use of testosterone in children can lead to masculinization, promotion of bone tissue growth and maturation, premature closure of the growth zone of the pineal gland, and decreased terminal growth.